Whooping Cough & Flu Vaccine

There are two vaccinations that are highly recommended in pregnancy Flu vaccine and Whooping cough.  The flu vaccine is developed each year and usually effective in treating two of the flu virus’s expected to be prevalent in the Australian winter that year. It is for this reason that a flu vaccine is recommended every year.  Pregnant women are considered one of the high risk groups and for this reason it is offered as a free vaccine with your GP. It may also be offered in some work places for free. Pregnant women are more susceptible to infection and can develop pneumonia  and dangerous infections needing hospitalization ,  especially if the  flu is contracted in the second and third trimester. The flu vaccine can be given at anytime in the pregnancy.

Whooping cough is a child hood illness that in recent years has become more prevalent. Whooping cough in adults in general is not a serious illness and can be easily treated with oral antibiotics. In newborn babies and infants it can be life threatening. The virus can cause the airway to close and resuscitation can be very difficult. Whooping Cough immunisation is now recommended by The  National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) with each pregnancy & can be safely given in the third trimester & ideally between  28 and 32 weeks. It is  a free vaccine for pregnant women available from the GP.

 http://www.health.nsw.gov.au/news/Pages/20150410_00.aspx

The use of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) to prevent transmission of genetic disorders.

We have attached a new article in the ‘documents’ section of our website.

‘The use of Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis to prevent transmission of Haemophilia A and B’ is an article published in a Haematology magazine.

Whilst the article is specific to Haemophilia, the concepts can be applied to any single gene disorder.

This article details the process of IVF and PGD.

It also explains the limitations of the process.